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News by Year

Press Release

Secretary of the Interior Walter J. Hickel, on behalf of President Richard Nixon, today announced the nomination of the following:

Hollis M. Dole, 54, of Portland, Oregon, to be Assistant Secretary for Mineral Resources;

Dr. Leslie L. Glasgow, 54, of Baton Rouge, Louisiana, to be Assistant Secretary for Fish and Wildlife and Parks and Marine Resources; and

Charles H. Meacham, 43, of Juneau, Alaska, to be Commissioner of Fish and Wildlife.

Also appointed today by Secretary Hickel were:

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Press Release

Secretary of the Interior Walter J. Hickel has announced the publication, in the Federal Register, of a list of 83 Indian tribes which conduct their own local law enforcement and are therefore eligible for assistance under the I Omnibus Crime Control and Safe Streets Act of 1968.

"These are the tribes which have clear-cut jurisdiction over law and order on their reservations," Hickel said, "and this publication makes it possible for them to make timely applications for Federal assistance in improving local crime control."

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Press Release

Award of a $941,100 contract to build a 10-classroom school at Peever, S.D., was announced today by the Bureau of Indian Affairs, Department of the Interior.

The contract includes a multi-purpose room, kitchen, instructional materials center and such facilities as utilities and paving.

When completed, the project will provide elementary school facilities for 300 Indian and non-Indian children in the area.

The low successful bid was by Schull Construction Co. Watertown, S.D. Eight other bids ranging to a high of $1,209,400 were received.

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Press Release

It is with a great deal of pleasure that I return to Shiprock for the dedication of this splendid new factory constructed by Navajo effort to house the largest industrial facility in the entire State of New Mexico.

The Navajo people have indeed moved into the, space age. In this plant, a subsidiary of the world-wide Fairchild Camera and Instrument Corporation, Navajos are today assembling some of the components that go into our Apollo rocket systems.

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Press Release

Approval of a reorganization under which the United Pueblos Agency with headquarters in Albuquerque, N.M., has been divided into two smaller agencies was announced by Commissioner of Indian Affairs Robert L. Bennett.

The new Northern Pueblos Agency, with headquarters, in Santa Fe, N.M., will serve the eight northern pueblos -- Nambe, Picurt, Pojoaque, San Ildefonso, San Juan, Santa Clara, Taos and Tesuque.

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Press Release

Secretary of the Interior Walter J. Hickel today announced his opposition to a proposed California-Nevada interstate water compact because it would adversely affect the rights of the Pyramid Lake Indians and threaten destruction of the Lake itself.

In a letter to Robert Mayo, Director of the Bureau of the Budget, Secretary Hickel urged that the Administration oppose the compact as drafted.

He recommended that the Federal Government enter negotiations with the two States as span as possible and work out a new formula.

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Press Release

Assistant Secretary of the Interior Harrison Loesch today directed the, Commissioner of Indian Affairs to replace immediately the Superintendent and the Principal of the Chilocco, Oklahoma, Indian school pending completion of a thorough investigation of conditions there.

The high school is run by the Interior Department's Bureau of Indian Affairs. It accommodates about 1,000 Indian boarding pupils from various parts of the nation.

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Press Release

The award of a $968,000 contract to remodel and expand the existing Kyle School on the Pine Ridge Indian Reservation in South Dakota was announced today by tie Department of the Interior's Bureau of Indian Affairs.

Existing facilities will be remodeled and anew addition will be constructed to provide multipurpose, administrative, and instructional materials spaces, 12 new classrooms, a kitchen, and two locker rooms, together with utilities, paving, and adjunct facilities.

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Press Release

Award of a $980,000 contract to construct a dormitory with sleeping rooms for 64 students, a kitchen-multi-use building adequate for 128 students, and adjunct facilities, , including utilities and paving at Eufaula, Okla., was announced today by the Bureau of Indian Affairs, Department of the Interior.

When completed, the project will provide living facilities for elementary and secondary school-age Indian children attending public schools in the City of Eufaula.

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Press Release

Timber sales on Indian owned land reached a record high of $26.7 million in calendar year 1968, topping a stumpage receipts of the previous year by almost $8.8 million, the Department of the Interior's Bureau of Indian Affairs announced.

Although the amount of timber harvested also reached a record 998 million board feet -- 98 million board feet over 1967 Bureau officials said rapidly rising timber prices were largely responsible for the income increase.

In addition to cash receipts, Indians cut more than 92 million board feet of timber for home and farm use and for fuel.

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Press Release

A Family Employment Training Center, the first established and directed by an all-Indian corporation, will open this fall at Bismarck, N.D.

Contracts for the project are being signed at the site of the Center today.

The United Tribes of North Dakota Development Corporation, whose membership includes all the tribes of North Dakota, announced that it will award the contract for the operation of the Center to Bendix Field Engineering, Corporation, Owings Mills, Md., a subsidiary of The Bendix Corporation.

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Press Release

Thirty-three Indian high school students are among 700 youngsters from all over the country, representing the National Association of Student Councils in a leadership workshop scheduled June 16 through June 30, in the Washington, D.C. and Baltimore areas.

The workshop is sponsored annually by the National Association of Secondary School Principals, but this is the first time that Indian students have been involved, the result of a working agreement recently completed between the Principals' group and the Bureau of Indian Affairs.

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Press Release

The Bureau of Indian Affairs, Department of the Interior, announced today a new edition of its popular, "American Indian Calendar" is available for purchase from the Superintendent of Documents in Washington, D.C.

The calendar, a much-requested booklet, lists important Indian events primarily in the 25 states where there are Indians having a service relationship with the Federal Government, giving information on pow-wows, rodeos, dances, religious observances, and arts and crafts exhibitions.

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Press Release

The Adoption Resource Exchange of North America (ARENA), placed 89 Indian children out of 119 registered with it in 1968, reports the Bureau of Indian Affairs of the Department of the Interior. The BIA works closely with the national organization.

Placement was pending at the end of 1968 for most of the remaining 30 Indian children.

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Press Release

A series of three prize-winning travel posters designed by American Indian art students are now available for sale to Indian tribes and Indian-interest organizations and through them to the general public, it was announced today.

Priced at $1.75 each, subjects include a classic Katchina figure; a black and white Indian on a horse against a brilliant yellow and range background; and a psychedelic design.

All three posters carry the theme, "Discover America with the First Americans," an invitation to visit Indian reservations at vacation time.

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Press Release

A total of 159 entries was submitted from 11 Bureau of Indian Affairs schools in the first travel poster contest sponsored by the Department of the Interior's Bureau of Indian Affairs and ARROW Inc., an Indian interest organization with headquarters in Washington, D.C.

Although all of the winners were from the Bureau's Institute of American Indian Arts, Santa Fe, N.M., David Young, BIA Art Director, was highly pleased with the general level of the entries.

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Press Release

The nomination of Harrison Loesch, a Montrose, Colo., lawyer specializing in land and water law, to the post of Assistant Secretary for Public Land management in the Department of the Interior was announced today.

The announcement, on behalf of President Nixon, was made by Interior Secretary Walter J. Hickel.

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Press Release

Secretary of the Interior Walter J. Hickel announced today the creation of a pilot training program for Indian policemen. Training will take place at the Bureau of Indian Affairs Roswell Employment Training Center, operated by the Thiokol Chemical Corp., at Roswell, N.M.

"This program will improve the basic skills of policemen serving Indian areas and thereby increase protection given Indian citizens. It also will help improve efficiency in the wide range of public service activities traditionally performed by police officers," Hickel said.

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Press Release

Commissioner of Indian Affairs Robert L. Bennett announced today that Barney Old Coyote, Interior Department Job Corps Conservation Center Coordinator since December 1964, has returned to the Department's Bureau of Indian Affairs as Assistant Director of its Sacramento, Calif., Area Office.

"Mr. Old Coyote has demonstrated his ability to work effectively and harmoniously with the Indian people," Bennett said, "and I know he will continue this record in California."

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Press Release

Awards totaling about $36 million were granted 13 American Indian groups by judgments of the Indian Claims Commission during 1968, the Bureau of Indian Affairs reported today.

Congress has appropriated funds for $30.6 million of the total granted. The appropriated funds earn interest for the tribes involved while the funds are on deposit to their credit.

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Press Release

Robert L. Bennett, Commissioner of Indian Affairs, has announced the appointment of Arthur O. Allen, a general engineer in the Bureau of Indian Affairs, as Assistant Commissioner for Engineering. Allen succeeds Fred M. Haverland, who retired January 11.

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Press Release

A roll to determine which Indians in California are eligible to share in two awards totaling $30 million in land claims funds is being prepared by the Bureau of Indian Affairs Area Office in Sacramento, according to Robert L. Bennett, Commissioner of Indian Affairs.

The money comes from awards in settlement of two Indian claims against the United States Government for approximately 65 mi11iQn acres of California land taken from the Indians without compensation.

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Press Release

Secretary of the Interior Stewart L. Udall announced today plans for establishment of an Educational Cultural Center for Alaskan Native students between the ages of 17 and 20 in cooperation with the University of Alaska.

Udall said the signing of an agreement with the University of Alaska by the Bureau of Indian Affairs brought to successful culmination negotiations which began on June 4, 1968.

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Press Release

The Eskimos sometimes arrive at the Seattle Orientation Center, a motel unit near the University of Washington, Seattle, in heavy parkas, wool clothing, and mukluks.

They come to Seattle as the first lap in a journey toward a better life. Each applied to the Bureau of Indian Affairs in Alaska to move to a large city where employment and training opportunities, are better than they are at home.

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Press Release

The Department of the Interior has issued an administrative order restoring to the San Carlos Apache Tribe full ownership of, approximately 200,000 acres of land known as the "mineral strip," ceded to the Government in 1896.

The land, lying along the southern border of the tribe's Arizona reservation, was ceded by the tribe with the understanding that the Government would supervise mineral recovery on the lands and return all mineral revenues to the tribe.

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Press Release

The Department of the Interior's Bureau of Indian Affairs announced steps are being taken to implement a ,new law which
provides for payment to the Southern Paiute Indians for lands taken from them in 1860. Regulations are being amended to permit
preparation of a tribal roll.

An Act of October 17, 1968, authorized the distribution of funds derived from a judgment by the Indian Claims Commission,
and directed the Department to prepare a roll to serve as a basis for paying the money.

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Press Release

The Department of the Interior said today a petition from the combined tribal councils of the Ute Mountain and Southern Ute Indian Tribes that the Bureau of Indian Affairs split up the Consolidated Ute Agency at Ignacio, Colo., into the Ute Mountain Agency, Towaoc, Colo., and the Southern Ute Agency, Ignacio, Colo., has been approved.

No additional funds or employees will be needed to accomplish the changes. The division into two separate agencies will give both of the Ute tribes better service, Bureau of Indian Affairs officials said. The change was made effective December 29.

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Press Release

Regulations governing the preparation of rolls for the payment to Creek Indians of two Indian Claims Commission judgments, totaling
more than $4 million, have been approved and published in the Federal Register, Robert L. Bennett, Commissioner of Indian Affairs, has announced.

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Press Release

The Justice Department has concluded after an F.B.I. investigation that allegations of brutality against students at the Chilocco, Okla., Indian School by some staff members were without foundation, Assistant Secretary of the Interior Harrison Loesch said today.

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Press Release

I have looked forward to this day -- to the chance to meet with you, to share in your 25th Anniversary celebration, to congratulate you - and especially your charter members, some of whom are here today -- for your vision and leadership.

An impressive as your past growth has been, even more impressive are the prospects for your contributions to the Indian future. As never before, the nation is aware of Indian problems and the need for clear, decisive Indian leadership.

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Press Release

To have the opportunity to address the group that represents so many of America's first citizens is indeed an honor for the Secretary of the Interior.

It is good to have the opportunity to get away from Washington, D. C. and out in the land, with you - America's first citizens. It is good to join you in celebrating this 25th anniversary of the NCAI.

Through your organization, America's Indians, individually and collectively have made great strides, unfortunately, the NCAI and all of the other Indian groups, for too long have been trying to carve out their niche alone.

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Press Release

Job opportunities for American Indians in careers involving the land and its resources are discussed in "Careers for Indians in
Agriculture," a new eight-page leaflet just published by the Bureau of Indian Affairs.

Aimed primarily at interesting high school students in furthering their education, the leaflet may be obtained from the Bureau of
Indian Affairs, Department of the Interior, Washington, D.C. 20242 or any Indian agency without cost.

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Press Release

A conference was held July 6-7 at Lake Tahoe on the California-Nevada border to discuss water needs of the area, including Lake Tahoe, the Truckee Carson River Irrigation District, and the water requirements of the Pyramid Lake Indians.

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Press Release

Indian children in three Bureau of Indian Affairs schools will be given special education services and assistance next school year with the help of funding by the Office of Education.

Schools in which the programs will be initiated include Wahpeton Indian School, Wahpeton, N.D.; Phoenix Indian School in Phoenix, Ariz. and Intermountain School, Brigham City, Utah.

The three programs are intended to establish guidelines for Similar, future operations in other Bureau schools, where they are applicable.

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Press Release

Secretary of the Interior Walter J. Hickel, on behalf of President Nixon, today announced the nomination of Louis R. Bruce, 6,3, of Richfield Springs, New York, as Commissioner of Indian Affairs.

Bruce, a member of the Oglala Sioux tribe of South Dakota, was praised by the Secretary as "a man of unparalleled qualifications, with the leadership skills and the desire necessary to carry out the Administration's pledge to bring dignity, education and economic progress to all of our American Indian, Eskimo and Aleut citizens.

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Press Release

It gives me special pleasure to announce, on behalf of the President, the nomination of Mr. Louis R. Bruce of New York State to be the new Commissioner of Indian Affairs. His biography is being passed out to you. As an enrolled member of the Sioux Tribe, Mr. Bruce has continually demonstrated his leadership among American Indians during a long and distinguished career.

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Press Release

The Bureau of Indian Affairs office of education has become part of a network of 19 innovative school systems across the Nation.

Called ES' 70 (Educational Systems for the 70's), the group consists of school systems that have developed specialties in a variety of fields, above and beyond the standard curricula.

Some systems have set up new ways to teach mathematics; others have developed unique social studies programs, and still others are conducting experimental projects in bi-lingual education.

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Press Release

Indian tribes put up about 28 percent of the total funds available last year for economic advancement in reservation areas, their participation increasing by more than $10.5 million over the 1967 tribal investment, the Bureau of Indian Affairs of the Department of the Interior reported today.

The dollar increase was an indication of increasing tribal initiative and involvement as Indian leadership moves toward greater self-determination.

A total of $92.3 million was put into economic advancement projects by the tribes last year, compared with $81.7 million in 1967.

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Press Release

Ground is being broken for a new Indian vocational-technical school at Albuquerque, N.M., the Department of the Interior's Bureau of Indian Affairs announced today.

An $8,778,185 contract for the school's construction recently was awarded to the Lembke Construction Co. of Albuquerque, which submitted the lowest of three bids.

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Press Release

The new Miss Indian America, Margery Winona Haury is in Washington for her first visit this far East, during which she plans to meet with government officials.

Since Monday, the 18-year old Indian beauty has been in Columbus, Ga., participating in a week-long TV presentation (WRBL-TV) honoring the American Indian.

Miss Haury, from Albuquerque, N.M. is a sophomore in pre-Law at the University of New Mexico. On her mother's side is Navajo and Sioux, and on her father's side, Cheyenne and Arapahoe.

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Press Release

Aided by record lumber prices, Indians in the United States earned $32.7 million -- twice the amount of two years ago -- from the sale of reservation timber in fiscal year 1969, the Department of the Interior's Bureau of Indian Affairs announced.

The $32.7 million represents an increase of $11 million over the previous fiscal year. However, Commissioner of Indian Affairs Louis R. Bruce said that the same level of income cannot be expected to continue in the face of recent declines in the market value of timber.

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Press Release

A special three-day Polar Plan Conference on Arctic problems ended today with direction from Secretary of the Interior Walter J. Hickel that future plans for the area should be viewed from an international standpoint.

"Knowledge of the world's polar regions will change not only the countries bordering on the Arctic -- it will change economic, social and cultural conditions throughout the world," Secretary Hickel said.

"I urge you to think of the Arctic as a single entity, so that all nations can contribute to its conservation and the wise use of its resources," he said.

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Press Release

President Chino, Vice Presidents, and friends. I am especially happy to be here at the 25th Anniversary Convention of the National Congress of American Indians.

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Press Release

"Graphic Arts of the Alaskan Eskimo," a new profusely illustrated 88-page publication, is now being offered for sale by the Government, the Department of the Interior announced today.

Illustrated with nearly 100 reproductions of graphic works of art by Alaskan Eskimos, the publication depicts such unusual items as engravings on ivory and watercolor drawings on skin and paper, as well as woodcuts, etchings, lithographs,and engravings.

An accompanying interpretive text is by anthropologist Dorothy Jean Ray.

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Press Release

Secretary of the Interior Walter J. Hickel announced today that the first meeting of the Pyramid Lake Task Force will be held October 16 at Reno. The Task Force includes representatives of the Department of the Interior and the States of California and Nevada.

The Task Force will study water allocations in the Truckee-Carson Basin and develop a plan intended to satisfy various water demands in the area.

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Press Release

Our Bible history tells us that Noah and his ark were on the stormy seas for 40 days and 40 nights before the waters receded.

I can tell you -- I think I know what life on that ark must have been. This is my 40th day as skipper of another ark, the Bureau of Indian Affairs. We did not have the time to scrape the barnacles off her hull before we were hit by Hurricane Teddy, battered a bit by Hurricane Wendell, and sprayed again with a lot of salt by the militants, at the NCAI Conference in Albuquerque.

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Press Release

A $1.6 million contract for expanded school facilities at Choctaw Central School, at Pearl River, Miss., has been awarded by the Department of the Interior's Bureau of Indian Affairs.

The contract calls for the construction of a 16-classroom building with offices and an instructional materials center; a combination music and industrial arts building; an addition to an existing dormitory building; a food storage building, and remodeling of some existing facilities.

The project includes related on-site improvements such as paving and utility systems.

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Press Release

A Forestry Service Center to help Indians develop productive capacities of their commercial forest lands has been established at Littleton, Colo., in the Denver metropolitan area, Commissioner of Indian Affairs Louis R. Bruce announced today.

The new office will be directly under the Central Office of the Department of the Interior's Bureau of Indian Affairs, and initially will be staffed with six employees. Bruce said the Cen­ter is centrally located to most Indian reservations.

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