U.S. flag

An official website of the United States government

Dot gov

Official websites use .gov
A .gov website belongs to an official government organization in the United States.

Https

Secure .gov websites use HTTPS
A lock () or https:// means you’ve safely connected to the .gov website. Share sensitive information only on official, secure websites.

What is a federal Indian reservation?

Submitted by DrupalMigration2017 on Sat, 08/19/2017 - 14:53

FAQ Category

Why Tribes Exist Today in the United States

In the United States there are three types of reserved federal lands:  military, public, and Indian.  A federal Indian reservation is an area of land reserved for a tribe or tribes under treaty or other agreement with the United States, executive order, or federal statute or administrative action as permanent tribal homelands, and where the federal government holds title to the land in trust on behalf of the tribe.

Approximately 56.2 million acres are held in trust by the United States for various Indian tribes and individuals.  There are approximately 326 Indian land areas in the U.S. administered as federal Indian reservations (i.e., reservations, pueblos, rancherias, missions, villages, communities, etc.).  The largest is the 16 million-acre Navajo Nation Reservation located in Arizona, New Mexico, and Utah.  The smallest is a 1.32-acre parcel in California where the Pit River Tribe’s cemetery is located.  Many of the smaller reservations are less than 1,000 acres.

Some reservations are the remnants of a tribe’s original land base.  Others were created by the federal government for the resettling of Indian people forcibly relocated from their homelands.  Not every federally recognized tribe has a reservation.  Federal Indian reservations are generally exempt from state jurisdiction, including taxation, except when Congress specifically authorizes such jurisdiction.

Was this page helpful?

This Page Was Not Helpful Because The Content:

indianaffairs.gov

An official website of the U.S. Department of the Interior

Looking for U.S. government information and services?
Visit USA.gov