Indian Affairs | Careers

Careers

There are more than 566 registered Native American Tribes within the boundaries of the United States of America. The Bureau of Indian Affairs (BIA), Office of Justice Services (OJS), provides police, corrections, and court services across this broad expanse of Indian Country. 

Careers

BIA-OJS Police Officers:   BIA Police are responsible for maintaining law and order within Indian Country by patrolling Indian reservations; enforcing tribal laws; and making arrests.  Officers respond to reports of misdemeanor crimes, felony crimes and suspicious activities received from the public.  They are responsible for completing investigations, preparing reports and forward their reports to Federal, Tribal or State prosecutors.  Officers are required to testify in tribal, Federal and state courts (if subpoenaed).  Officers also work with tribal communities, schools and tribal programs to provide a safer environment. BIA-OJS respond to emergency situations involving natural and man-made situations.   

BIA-OJS Special Agents:  BIA SA's investigate Federal crimes in Indian Country.  This requires working closely with Tribal, Federal and State Law Enforcement on criminal cases.  Agents  investigate tribal and Federal crimes throughout Indian Country.   They are responsible for processing crime scenes, conducting interviews,  evidence handling, preparing search/arrest warrants, apprehension and arrest, serving warrants, assisting with court preparation and testifying in court.  Agents work closely with Tribal, State and Federal law enforcement.  Agents are trained through the Criminal Investigation Training Program at the Federal Law Enforcement Training Center in Glynco, GA., and participate in annual specialized law enforcement and investigative training. Agents prepare case reports and forward to Assistant United States Attorney’s office, for review of Federal charges, assist with tribal preparation and testify in the court of jurisdiction.  Agents may also work on task force teams to assist other agencies to combat crime.  

BIA-OJS Correction Officers:  Correction Officers maintain the safety and security of inmates housed in correctional facilities.  Corrections Officers are responsible for the safe transportation of inmates to and from court, as well as medical and dental appointments.  Correction Officers ensure personal data is secured as well as confidential information and inmate property.  CO's interact with the public and inmates on a daily basis.  BIA Correction Officers must possess good communication skills and conflict resolution skills.  

BIA-OJS Telecommunication Specialists: The Telecommunications Specialists monitor police radio frequencies, telephone (911) lines and public contact.  They are responsible for dispatching police officers to calls for service, maintain radio contact with police officers, emergency management agencies and other law enforcement departments. Telecommunication Specialists conduct driver checks, criminal warrant checks, and criminal history inquiries to ensure the safety of responding officers.

BIA-OJS Chief of Police: The Chief of Police is responsible for the daily operation of the police department, correctional facilities and telecommunications which are under the agency he is assigned.  COP's monitor and maintain the budget for the police department. They work closely with other law enforcement departments; tribal prosecutors; Federal prosecutors; tribal courts; tribal programs and Tribal Council, and develop a community policing program for the reservation.  COP's institute programs to enhance safety in the community and local schools.  

BIA-OJS Support Personnel: BIA Law Enforcement Assistants (LEA) and Law Enforcement Specialists (LES) maintain confidential data, employee records, purchasing and procurement documents, and travel documentation.  BIA LEAs and LES’ often communicate with our direct services and tribal partner to gather criminal statistics reporting, detention reports, and requests for technical assistance or opportunities for additional funding.  LEA’s and LES greet the public and visiting dignitaries from State, Tribal, Local, and other Federal agencies.  LEA’s and LES’ are the backbone of the organization that maintain our administrative needs to provide essential services to Indian Country.     

Program Analysts:  Each District is staffed with a Program Analyst who is responsible for providing technical assistanct to BIA-OJS and tribal partners, regarding data collection and reporting requirements of crime statistics. They are also responsible for managing the District's Freedom of Information (FOIA) program in accordance with the FOIA regulations. 

BIA-OJS Victims Specialists:   Victim Assistance supports the mission of OJS by providing services and assistance to victims of crimes in Indian Country.  In conjunction with law enforcement, the Victim Specialists provide information, referrals, notifications, and services to identified crime victims.  The Victim Specialists function and navigate during stressful and traumatic events to provide appropriate and effective responses to victims.